in Child Care & Parenting, Family Life & Parenting, Online Shopping, Personal Posts

Baby Leaf Cloth Diapers for Neo

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So we’ve finally switched to cloth diapers. I’ve been wanting to let Neo try them because I’ve heard that they’re more economical and fun to use. Ray bought a starter of two packs (a total of six cloth nappies) from SM Department Store.

The Baby Leaf One-Size Pocket Cloth Diaper is an all-in-one snap diaper that grows with your baby. It is adjustable and fits 7 to 35 lbs babies, with a pocket-style feature for inserts. I was like, “Sayang, sana dati pa siya nagsuot nito!”

Baby Leaf Cloth Diaper Price
There are several reasons why we’ve both decided to choose cloth diapers vs. disposable diapers:

  • Eco-friendly. No more huge volumes of plastic to throw away!
  • Cloth diapers [will] allow for more savings. They’re washable and reusable, plus this One-Size cloth diapers can be used until my toddler’s last diaper days.
  • Safe and healthy to be used by babies. Disposable diapers contain chemicals that may harm babies on a long-term use. Cloth diapers are free from those harmful chemicals.
  • They’re fun to use! They come in multiple colors and prints so it’s like picking out a fancy bottom wear for N each time.

 
A major con, for me, is convenience. I know that they’re made to be ‘more’ convenient because they’re just as easy to put on as disposables (and compared to those old “lampins” that needed pins, cloth diapers nowadays have snaps), but scooping out the stickiest of poops is just.. gross. And aside from the icky part, these cloth diapers make a large load to my laundry. Of course I need to keep them hygienic and clean so I sometimes do take twos (to completely remove the stinky smell na rin). The recommended detergent amount is half of what I normally use, so I guess it compensates for the additional use of soap. FYI, cloth nappies shouldn’t be bleached or washed with fabric softeners.

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cloth-diapers-infographic
Despite a few disadvantages, this infographic from domesticguidelines.com.au shows that cloth diapers are still better than throwaways.

 

Another disadvantage that was mentioned online is the spread of infection from a dirty cloth diaper that was left for long hours. ‘Use then Dispose’ seems to be more sanitary but it actually depends on the person handling the diapers. To keep the infection from spreading, I use a separate wash bin to store/rinse dirty diapers, then I disinfect the bin with bleach after each use. Right now I’m using regular detergent to clean the nappies but I’m going to use antibacterial detergent on my next laundry day.

There are a few rashes appearing on my child’s bottom but it’s not something to get worried about (hello petroleum jelly and rash creams!). The moisture from the cloth (yes, it’s not 100% dry compared to disposables) is both an advantage and a disadvantage. The slight wetness may cause rashes but it can also help your child learn potty training more quickly by communicating his/her discomfort. Ding!

So with everything being laid down – facts, pros & cons, personal experiences – I still vote for cloth diapers. But.. I’m not ditching the disposables yet. I’ll be needing them for travelling.

Cloth Diapers Cute Prints - Baby Leaf
Baby Leaf One-Size Pocket Cloth Diapers (Pack of 3s)
PhP 1,100

Going back to Baby Leaf cloth diapers, Ray was allowed to switch diapers inside packs so he picked out the coolest prints for our toddler: Blue Ocean, Cute Doodle, Vroom Vroom, Ocean Pals, Traffic Jam, and Ball Craze.

So here’s a closer look at its breathable and waterproof cover (leak-proof, except when inserts bunch up in the middle). It’s made from stretchy fabric and has multiple snaps on the front. The ones on the lower part can be snapped together to make a tiny diaper.

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Cloth Diaper Snap Covers

This is the inner layer. It has a pocket for the insert, hence the name ‘pocket diaper’. Label says it’s made from soft micro fleece fabric. This kind of fabric keeps away most of the wetness from the skin, but not 100%.

Baby Leaf Cloth Diapers

The microfiber insert is a rectangular pad that’s super absorbent. Here’s a close-up shot. I always make sure that I place it properly each time so it won’t easily twist or bunch up.

Cloth Diaper Insert Fabric

Aside from department stores, you may also buy Baby Leaf diapers from their official website, babyleaf.com.ph. Single nappies costs almost PhP 400 each. They also have pocket diapers in plain rainbow colors.

Baby Leaf Cloth Diapers Philippines

Looking at these prints makes me envious of moms with baby girls!

Baby Leaf Diapers Philippines

Cloth diapers have changed a lot since Grandma’s day, and my little pooper is one lucky kid because he gets to experience this breakthrough in reusable diapering.

Cloth Diaper Reviews

Have you also switched to cloth diapering? Share your thoughts below!

 

Baby Leaf
www.babyleaf.com.ph
facebook.com/babyleafdiapers

2 Comments

  1. Baby Leaf

    Hi Shalene, it is an honor to be featured in your blog. We are glad that you have decided to cloth diaper your baby. We would like to let you know that we don’t use bleach on the diapers and rash creams are not recommended for cloth diapering. We hope your cloth diapering journey would be awesome! If you have any questions, please feel free to email us. More Power to your blog and keep up your great work!

    – Baby Leaf –

    28 . Feb . 2015
    • Shalene Rivera

      Hi! Yes I don’t use bleach on cloth diapers. Thank you for visiting my blog! 🙂

      17 . Mar . 2015

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